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Blood pressure in our 30s and 40s has lasting impact on brain health

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Blood pressure in our 30s and 40s has lasting impact on brain health

Blood pressure in our 30s and 40s has lasting impact on brain health



A new study followed adults from their mid-30s into their early
70s. It shows an association between blood pressure changes in early
adulthood and midlife and brain changes at the endpoint of the study.





Blood pressure linked to brain health




At what age should we start monitoring people's blood pressure?





High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, stroke, and kidney disease.





With around 15–20% of our blood going to the brain, the National
Institute of Aging (NIA), part of the National Institutes of Health
(NIH), explain that "the blood flow that keeps the brain healthy can, if
reduced or blocked, harm this essential organ."





A recent study, which Medical News Today featured earlier this month, indicates that intensive blood pressure
treatment in mid-life — or lowering of systolic blood pressure to below
120 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) — is linked to fewer white matter
lesions in the brain in later life.





White matter lesions are a sign of blood vessel damage in the brain and are a hallmark sign of aging and a risk factor for cognitive decline.





In the United Kingdom, routine blood pressure monitoring starts around 40 years of age.





Yet, researchers from University College London in the U.K., and
colleagues, suggest this should start earlier. They are basing this view
on the findings of their latest study on the long term effects of blood
pressure on brain health.


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